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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story outfront. gun battle. president obama proposed 23 executive actions. 23. among them, ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. background checks. and strengthening mental health reporting and regulation. the nra said only honest law abiding gun owners will be affected and our children will remain vulnerable to the inevitability of more tragedy. what is the nra's strategy when it comes to this debate. >> are the president's kids more important than yours. >> reporter: in a hard hitting response the nra has rolled out this ad saying the president is happy to have armed secret service agents protecting his children but for everyone else. >> a hypocrit when it comes to fair share of security. >> reporter: it is the latest muscle flex by the gun group superpack which last year spent more than $16 million to influence political races. that is not a tremendous amount for such efforts. big oil, the pharmacy industry and retired people have more and better
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> our second story, gun battle. president obama proposed 23 actions that would help reduce gun violence. among them, ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, background checks. that is no surprise. strengthening mental health reporting and regulation. in reaction to the president, nra said, i'll quote them, only honest, law-abiding gun owners will be affected and our children will remain vulnerable. what is the nra strategy when it comes to this debate? here is tom foreman with an out front investigation on how the nra gets what it wants. >> are the president's kids more important than yours? >> in a hard-hitting response to calls to are new gun restriction, the nra has rolled out this ad attacking the white house saying the president is happy to have armed secret service agents protecting his children but for everyone else -- >> he is just another elitist hypocrite when it comes to a fair share of security. >> reporter: it is the latest muscle flex by the gun grou
sports and all society have to reckon with at some point is the fact that the technology and science are going to raise these questions over and over again as we go forward. because it's not totally clear where you start -- where you draw the lines. right now we think tommy johns surgery is okay, even though you come back with a stronger arm than you had before. that's a medical enhancement. that's not something that's part of your natural gift. that's something that you earned. at some point we'll have laser surgery that will allow them to see better. is that a drug? is that something you should be allowed to have or not? people will be able to do things scientifically, technologically to their bodies to make them better performers without any effort. so where do the lines get drawn? how do we figure out how to cope with the march of science? >> like a futurologist. >> last month bartolo colon, came back from a 93 miles an hour. >> that's okay but hgh isn't. again, where do the lines get drawn? >> the reason i'm here today is because i had my blood spun last night. >> juicing. >> i'
and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made progress. we are moving towards our ultimate goal of getting to a $4 trillion reduction. and there will be more deficit reduction when congress decides what to do about the $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts that have been pushed off until next month. the fact is, though, we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. the cuts we've already made to priorities other than medicare, medicaid, social s
person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now more than ever, we must do these things together as one nation and one people. [ applause ] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [ cheers and applause ] an economic recovery has begun. [ cheers and applause ] america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands. youth and drive, diversity and openness, an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. [ cheers and applause ] for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> next monday president obama will be sworn into office for his second presidential term, and we continue our look back at great inaugural moments. here is the first president who was born in the 20th century, john f. kennedy. >> let the word go forth from this time and place to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of americans born in this century, tempered by war disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage, and unwilling to witness or permit the small undoing of those human rights to which this nation has always been committed and to which we are committed today at home and around the world. >> wow. later in that speech jfk said another of his most famous lines, ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. it's a line he paraphrased from george st. john, the headmaster at his prep school. i learned that nugget while researching for my book, "jac
. the center for science and the public interest, a non-profit consumer advocacy group says sugary drinks are the number one source of calories in the american diet. they put out their famous version of the coca-cola bear called the real bear. ♪ sugar, sugar, so good, so good, sugar ♪ >> coca-cola said "obesity is complex and requires partnership and collaboration to help solve it. we have an important role to play in the effort to find solutions that work for everybody." let's bring in our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. so i know it's a tough topic. coke says it can play an important role in america's fight against obesity, it says it's decreased the calories in its products. in middle schools it sells juices instead of cans of coke. it says it's doing its part. what's the big deal? leave us alone? >> i think that's part of it. there's a fear of regulation, we've seen it, you've talked about it in your piece from what mayor bloomberg is doing, the center for science and public interest has been very critical of what coke and other soft drink companies have done. it's n
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. v s to go gault. and create a self-sustaining community based on the philosophy of ayn rand's character, john gault in her book atlas shrug a book originally titled hey it is totally cool to be a selfish douchebag. independence park will be inspired by disneyland but built on the principles of the free market where families can "find happiness, inspiration courage and hope" without any of the big government socialism like libraries or post offices or the u.s. army. glenn beck's community will surround a lake that is larger than all of disneyland. it will provide its own food and energy produce its own tv and film content in its own studio. it will house a theme park and a residential community. and create a national learning center where people can send their kids to, in glenn's words be deprogrammed. i say bring it on, glenn! afterall man, you've conquered radio, tv, internet. you have chased away more sponsors than lindsay lohan did at betty ford. america is rea
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> cenk: we're back here on the "young turks." a little while ago a congressman was chased down by two reporters. they were asking him wait a minute it looks like you took a job with duke energy while you're still in congress. i know you rush out of congress to get the lobbyist jobs, but you're still negotiating things with the fiscal cliff, et cetera. >> are you planning to become a lobbyist? >> no. >> what will you do after this year? just want to get you on record here. >> you're barking up the wrong tree. >> what do you plan to do after you retire? >> have a better job than you guys have, that's for sure. [ laughter ] >> cenk: have a better job than you, because i'm going to sell out and be a lobbyist. he did and now works for duke energy a job he took before he stopped being a congressman. what is a congressional salary? $175,000$175,000 a year. they pay their c.e.o. $440,000. the american gaming association pay $1.9 million and the congressman and senators a
:00 eastern we will examine precisely that. why we cheat, the psychology and science behind cheating. we're all over it. don't miss it tomorrow. that's it for me here m i'm brooke baldwin in atlanta. now we go to washington to wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins now. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, breaking news. americans held hostage in a deadly terrorist attack in algeria. we'll have the latest. >>> also, the president of the nra is here in "the situation room." we're getting his reaction to the sweeping proposals against gun violence. and the presidential inauguration only five days away. we'll take you inside the law enforcement command center working to keep him safe. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> this is cnn breaking news. >> let's get to the breaking news. a deadly terrorist attack on a gas field in eastern algeria near the libyan border. some of the more than 40 hostages seized have been released but a number of them are still being held, including americans. the state department confirms those americans are affiliated with the oil gian
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price" tool. you tell us the price you want to pay, and we give you a range of options to choose from. careful, though -- that kind of power can go to your head. that explains a lot. yo, buddy! i got this. gimme one, gimme one, gimme one! the power of the "name your price" tool. only from progressive.
people can't see the dot on the horizon that you see? >> we associate utopia with science fiction showing those visions gone wrong. we associate utopia with how we perceive communism, especially soviet communism. because utopia has been so discredited, so dragged through the mud politically, especially during the years of the cold war, that anyone who speaks in that language is dismissed in one form or another. >> would you call frederick douglas utopian? barack obama utopian? >> frederick douglas, i imagine, was like the other abolitioni s abolitionists, regarded as dabbling in dreams. and would have been dismissed as a dreamer, or worse, a fraud. because when his first autobiography came out, when the narrative came out, many people questioned whether he had written it himself. it was impossible that a slave could have written these words. it must have been one of his abolitionist friends, one of his white abolitionist friends. it must have been garrison, et cetera. well, it turns out that, indeed, douglas wrote those words. >> do you feel the same way four years later about that momen
last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. jon: new details on a bizarre kidnapping of a five-year-old girl take friend her school in philadelphia earlier this week. police are searching for a machine and woman involved in the kidnapping. the little girl was found safe we are happy to report. rick folbaum has more for us now. >> reporter: this ordeal for the young girl began monday morning not long after the start of the school day. a woman wearing muslim garb came to her school, said she was the 5-year-old's mother and said she was taking the girl out for breakfast. none of it was true, but it was enough to convince the staff to let her go with her. instead of going to breakfast the girl was in fact kidnapped, taken to a house. she was told to remove her clothes, she was tied up and blindfold eld with the help of other person, a man. here is the local police captain. >> we do know he was inside the residence and joined his female abductor in restraining this child through the night until the next day. this little girl suffered, you know, cond
, the regulation that you have is going to have to be based on science. that's what the law says. what science are you going to use? and her answer was, well, we'll use mostly the united nations ipcc. lot of the people don't realize that this thing was -- i wrote a whole book about this, that this all started way back 12 years ago and it was a thing by the united nations, they formed the ipcc, intergovernmental panel on climate change and they came up with all this stuff. so she said it's going to be on the ipcc. well, poetic justice couldn't have done it better if we had planned. because it was not weeks after that, it was days after that that what happened, climategate. all of a sudden they realized through some leaked information that the ipcc had been lying all those years. i'll just mention a couple things. the u. u.k. telegraph said it's the worst scientific scandal of our generation, clive cooke of the financial times says the stink of corruption is overpowering. other ipcc prominent physicist resigns because -- quote -- "climategate was a fraud on a scale i've never seen." further, thi
to a program to encourage people who attend u.s. universities with science, technology, engineering and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very
activities and classes. how to stop talking about legitimate rape and insulting women, science 101, creating task breaks and tax shelters for million air campaign donors and after that ppp poll showing how unpopular congress really is, there's how to increase our approval ratings. what root canals, traffic jams, cockroaches, and head lice are doing to us. and republicans are presumably doing wrong i guess. up next, the house of representatives will be voting tonight on a big aide package for the victims of hurricane sandy. but will republicans go along with it? especially from the south. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> i'm sue herera with your cnbc market wrap. the dounl gained 27 points. the s&p gained a point and the nasdaq sl
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. weaker in review from the ingraham angle segment tonight. ms. laura causing controversy by saying this. >> the more i think about it, the more it seems that collin powell's appearance on meet the press was well-coordinated with the white house. with his deer friend with whom he campaigned, barack obama. when i hear an african-american president make comments about they don't like to socialize with me they demonize me? i think we are playing the victim card here. playing -- maybe playing the race card. it works well with that -- that collin obama narrative. >> bill: joining us now from washington is miss laura. let me just set this up. collin powell goes out on meet the press i don't know whether he did anything else. his main intent was to say that chuck hagel is a good guy and should be confirmed as secretary of state. right? they they trot him out. so obviously, somebody had to ask him to do that and you believe that it came from within the white house? >> well, yeah. what better person really to go
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> with hotwire's low prices, i can afford to visit chicago for my first big race and l.a. for my best friend's wedding. because when hotels have unsold rooms, they use hotwire so i got my hotels for half-price! >> men: ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com >> bill: back of the book segment tonight. watters world the movie edition. as you may know the oscar nominations are out. let's be honest. movies not what they used to be. so we sent jesse watters out to ask regular folks their opinions on the best and worst films of all time. >> all time greatest movie, according to you is, what? >> one of my favorites is fight club. one of those twisted kind of movies. >> you do not talk about fight club. >> don't punch me. >> the hobbit. >> it may have had a few things added but it stuck to the plot. >> you are a smart kid. >> thanks. >> shawshank redemption. no one can argue me, no one. >> i will be damn. >> did you cry when you saw shaw sank. >> who didn't cry wh
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> if we're going to win in the future, republicans need to do better among latinos, and they need to do better among women, particularly single women. >> we need to fight for 100% of the electorate, not 53%, not 52%, but 100%. >> oh, yes. after the election republicans were acting and talking like they understood why they got drubbed at the polls. not enough women and minority voters who here is the solution they came up with. hold a three-day retreat at a former plantation and hire a pollster to come in and train gop members on the fine points of seducing the female vote. now, for starters, they're saying rape is a four-letter word. don't say it. it's good advice, fellows. joining us, joan walsh, editor at salon.com and krystal ball host of msnbc's "the cycle." krystal, you ran for congress. did you have to be told not to talk about rape? did you have talking points on that? >> i don't recall anyone specifically sitting me down and saying don't talk about rape, but it was sort of
and deficit reduction. he spoke at the briefing today hosted by the christian science monitor for an hour. >> thanks for coming. i'm dave cook from the monitor. welcome to the first breakfast of the new year. the guest is representative sander levin of michigan cranking member of the house ways and means committee. this is the first visit of the group. he did for deily to detroit native and the university of chicago, master's and international relations of columbia and a law degree from harvard who was elected in the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as a senate minority leader during the carter administration he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development elected to the house in 1982. for four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march, 2010, representative levin one the gavel of the chairman of the ways and means committee. in the biographical portion of the program now on to the thrilling portion. as always we are on the record please, no blogging and tweeting while the breakfast is underway. there is no embargo when the breakfas
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> it's a huge moment in history, and for many, an opportunity to cash in. cnn's emily schmidt has more on the presidential inauguration. >> reporter: an inauguration comes down to this. one hand on a bible, the other raised in an ath. >> i do solemnly swear. >> reporter: that's the moment in history which makes so many others try to get their hands on this. >> how many different ways can you say you support obama? >> reporter: the presidential inaugural committee store is up and running. ready for shoppers marking the occasion with officially sanctioned, made in the usa, memorabilia. what are you seeing that you like? >> i like everything. and that's my problem, because, just being such an historic event, i want to have a lot of merchandise to share and a lot of merchandise to give other people who could not, you know, come and visit. >> reporter: it is likely president obama will take the oath of office on what will be a cold january day, so people are stocking up on warm sweatshirts and
the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation and one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. [applause] america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it -- so long as we seize it together. [applause] for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. [applause] we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person can f
: the science on this is pretty clear -- the question of how you dress -- address thus is obviously much less clear. but caller is alluding to the idea of there being some kind of carbon tax, some kind of way of making it less economically attractive to burn fossil fuels thereby increasing the cost which is then passed on to taxpayers in directly with regulatory action. to do that can have the same the fact. -- effect. there's no question there is an economic cost to addressing this. some of them are direct to consumers and some are little bit longer term and harder to see. it will impose strict regulatory regimes on burning carbon fuels, do we become less globally competitive with countries like china and india that are moving much lower if at all to address this? can -- they can manufacture things cheaply than we can as a result. it ultimately comes down to a value system of -- do we want to sustain our competitiveness for now or do we want to try to head off a problem that is accumulating gradually and will be a much bigger problem potentially down the road host: we are waiting for the hou
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ [ male announcer ] let's take every drop of courage, every ounce of inspiration, every bit of determination, and go where we've never gone before. ♪ introducing the radically new avalon. toyota. let's go places. introducing the radically new avalon. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. fiber one. uh, forgot jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's for breakfast? um... try the number one! yeah, this is pretty good. [ male announcer ] over a third of a day's fiber. fiber one. >>steve: the white house quadrupling the number of signatures required for a petition to get an official response. now they want 100,000 signatures in 30 days. the change comes after a request calling on the white house to disavow executive orders concerning gun rights. th
that -- >> to overlook that reality is really -- >> -- the basic science. but the application of the basic science comes from entrepreneurs and people that are in the business for profit. no? medical devices -- >> the health care system has got a profit making component. it's got a large nonprofit component. it's got a public component. but the innovation is heavily funded by the public sector, of course. >> in general would you say that the private sector is more ee fishent in doing certain things than the government? >> the private sector is certainly more efficient at doing certain things than the government. and the public sector is more efficient, particularly in providing insurance than the private sector is. >> james, we're going to leave it there. it's a debate that i imagine is going to continue, and we'll have to have you back to continue it. thanks so much. >> thank you very much. >> coming up. a shortage at the u.s. mint. we're going to tell you what's in low supply next. and then at 8:30, gamco's howard ward will join us to talk earnings. lots of major reports due next week. we've had some
fascism and communism's with muskets are in no if no single person can train all the math and science teachers for what they will need to quit the children of the future for. or build the road to networks and research labs that will bring new jobs to our shores. now more than ever, we must do these things together. as one nation and one people. [cheers] [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises steel our resolve and prove evers-williams. a decade of war has not ended. [cheers] [applause] and economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless. for we possess all the qualities of this world, youth and diversity and openness. unless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will seize it so long as we see fit together. [cheers] [applause] we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well in the growing many barely make it. [cheers] [applause] we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know
story right now out of hollywood. a member of the academy of motion pictures arts and sciences the group that organizations the academy awards is calling for a boycott of the controversial film "zero dark thirty," that doesn't look good for its chances, blasting the film, the torture scenes, used to hunts for the leader bin laden. and the enhanced interrogation as more critical in finding and getting bin laden than in fact they were, you tell me where we stand now. >> reporter: sure, and that's the controversy. and the name of this member of this academy is david chrennen and he says he knows he can be picked out of the academy for disclosing his intentions and doesn't care. he says because of the torture scenes in "zero dark thirty," he won't vote for the movie or anything else involved in it, and zero never acknowledges that torture is immoral and criminal and does portray torture as being results. anyone who promotcontributes sk and energy to the motion picture, including actors, shares responsibility for the impressions the pictures makes. and he wants others from the academy to snu
about this last week. i wish you guys would get into -- a little bit more into the science of this -- just to maintain i guess a little more credibility with the nonnut gun nut owners throughout. there is a lot of difference between rounds with dead kids, it shouldn't make any difference but to the audience we're trying to win over and understand, we need to establish more credibility. that's kind of why she did make a good point yesterday about the differences. >> stephanie: differences between what? >> well, two guns. sks or an ak-style round is radically different than this 223 or 5.56 i think is m-16 round. the 5.5 was designed to defeat the geneva convention. >> stephanie: right. >> caller: because it does through the action of the bullet what the old dumdum bullets used to do. >> stephanie: okay. all right. >> caller: when we throw them all in there together, when we make the laws and they got a common, i support the president on this, i'm really tired of the -- if the shooters -- nra people would spend less time shooting at one-dimensional targets, maybe they wouldn'
: the national academy of sciences put out a report in 2004 and they could not find any benefit. the entire panel agreed on that. you look at what type of guns get turned then and 99% of the guns are not operational. they are just something that people have around, maybe rusting for decades or something like that so they go and get rid of them. host: georgia, republican -- caller: i have three quick points -- i like the contrast between the differences of semi automatic guns. i would like for someone to define what is an assault rifle. they are all mostly semi automatic so why not call them all assault -- all assault weapons so one abandoned. to me, the background check is not for the mental attitude of an individual. guest: i agree with what the caller was saying. you want to go and ban guns, it should be based on the characteristic of the guns in terms of how they operate. how did they fire bullets, the rapidity with which they fire, the damage whichwith which they used and not how much the gun looks. you should not ban guns based on what it looks like. that is one reason why i don't think anyb
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)